About

Spring Creek Farms

 
 
 
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We aim to raise the healthiest food possible and be good stewards of the environment.

Our 287 acres have been certified organic since 1999. There have been no chemicals applied since 1991 and all of our lands has been growing grass since 1996. This has created a very biologically active soil. Since we stopped using chemicals, the soil started healing itself naturally using weeds and calcium to build conditions that will sustain soil bacteria and organisms that will utilize decaying grass and fertilizer. The past few years we have not had much weed or insect trouble, and have found high mineral readings in the soil and grass. If the cows and chickens are eating healthy food, that means nutrient-dense food for you as well.

The organic matter levels in our soil have risen from 2% to 6% since 1991. For every 1% increase in soil organic matter, 1,200 lbs of carbon per acre are sequestered in the soil USDA Applied Research Lab conducted a study of dairy farms who graze their cows on perennial grassland like us. Their data showed erosion levels decreased by 80% when row cropland (corn and soybeans) was converted to grassland. The carbon footprint on the grassland dairy farms opposed to a conventional cropped dairy farm was reduced by 80% as well.

Go to www.ars.usda.gov to read more on pasture management studies.

 
 
 
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Our Cows

Our Jersey, Ayshire and Holstein breeds are raised entirely on pasture from birth to milking age. The milking cows are moved to a new pasture every 12 hours from April to December and are fed hay that was grown on our farm during the winter. The calves and heifers are moved once per day to a new pasture. Grass-fed milk and meat are high in Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA) which is a potent cancer preventer, and Omega 3 fatty acids which reduces heart attack risk. Why take supplements when these nutrients are biologically available in our food?

Please read more about the benefits of eating grass-fed food at Eatwild.com